The IHS Markit US Manufacturing PMI fell to 55 in January of 2022 from 56.7 in December, well below forecasts of 56.7, and pointing to the slowest growth in factory activity in 15 months, preliminary estimates showed. Output levels were broadly unchanged, as new order growth slowed to the softest rate since July 2020. Alongside labor and material shortages, firms noted that customers were keen to reduce spending amid sharp hikes in costs. The rate of cost inflation eased again and was the slowest since May 2021 and charge inflation was the least marked since April 2021. Labor shortages, a high turnover of staff and reports of the non-replacement of voluntary leavers led to the first decline in employment since July 2020. Finally, confidence was the highest since November 2020 amid hopes of stable supply flows and a reduction in the impact of COVID-19. source: Markit Economics

Manufacturing PMI in the United States averaged 53.95 points from 2012 until 2022, reaching an all time high of 63.40 points in July of 2021 and a record low of 36.10 points in April of 2020. This page provides the latest reported value for - United States Manufacturing PMI - plus previous releases, historical high and low, short-term forecast and long-term prediction, economic calendar, survey consensus and news. United States Manufacturing PMI - data, historical chart, forecasts and calendar of releases - was last updated on January of 2022.

Manufacturing PMI in the United States is expected to be 54.20 points by the end of this quarter, according to Trading Economics global macro models and analysts expectations. In the long-term, the United States Manufacturing PMI is projected to trend around 52.00 points in 2023, according to our econometric models.

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United States Manufacturing PMI


United States Manufacturing PMI
In the United States, the Markit Manufacturing Purchasing Managers’ Index measures the performance of the manufacturing sector and is derived from a survey of 600 industrial companies. The Manufacturing Purchasing Managers Index is based on five individual indexes with the following weights: New Orders (30 percent), Output (25 percent), Employment (20 percent), Suppliers’ Delivery Times (15 percent) and Stock of Items Purchased (10 percent), with the Delivery Times index inverted so that it moves in a comparable direction. A reading above 50 indicates an expansion of the manufacturing sector compared to the previous month; below 50 represents a contraction; while 50 indicates no change.
Actual Previous Highest Lowest Dates Unit Frequency
55.00 57.70 63.40 36.10 2012 - 2022 points Monthly
SA

Related Last Previous Unit Reference
Manufacturing PMI 55.00 57.70 points Jan/22
Services PMI 50.90 57.60 points Jan/22
Business Confidence 58.70 61.10 points Dec/21
Composite PMI 50.80 57.00 points Jan/22
Manufacturing Production 3.50 4.50 percent Dec/21
Factory Orders 1.60 1.20 percent Nov/21
Philadelphia Fed Manufacturing Index 23.20 15.40 points Jan/22
NY Empire State Manufacturing Index -0.70 31.90 points Jan/22
Chicago Fed National Activity Index -0.15 0.44 points Dec/21
Dallas Fed Manufacturing Index 8.10 11.80 points Dec/21
Kansas Fed Manufacturing Index 10.00 17.00 points Dec/21


News Stream
US Factory Growth Lowest in 15 Months
The IHS Markit US Manufacturing PMI fell to 55 in January of 2022 from 56.7 in December, well below forecasts of 56.7, and pointing to the slowest growth in factory activity in 15 months, preliminary estimates showed. Output levels were broadly unchanged, as new order growth slowed to the softest rate since July 2020. Alongside labor and material shortages, firms noted that customers were keen to reduce spending amid sharp hikes in costs. The rate of cost inflation eased again and was the slowest since May 2021 and charge inflation was the least marked since April 2021. Labor shortages, a high turnover of staff and reports of the non-replacement of voluntary leavers led to the first decline in employment since July 2020. Finally, confidence was the highest since November 2020 amid hopes of stable supply flows and a reduction in the impact of COVID-19.
2022-01-24
US Manufacturing PMI Revised Slightly Lower: Markit
The IHS Markit US Manufacturing PMI was revised slightly lower to 57.7 in December of 2021 from a preliminary of 57.8, still pointing to a strong expansion in factory activity. Still, companies recorded the softest rise in new orders for a year and a further substantial deterioration in vendor performance amid severe material shortages. Longer lead times for inputs also led to another sharp increase in backlogs of work, albeit the slowest for ten months. Meanwhile, cost burdens continued to increase markedly despite the rate of inflation softening to the slowest since June. Efforts to pass-through greater costs to clients were hampered by softer demand conditions, as charges rose at the slowest rate since April. Finally, output expectations for the year ahead strengthened to the highest since November 2020. Optimism stemmed from hopes of reduced supply disruption and a greater ability to hire suitable workers.
2022-01-03
US Factory Growth Unexpectedly Slows to 1-Year Low: Markit
The IHS Markit Manufacturing PMI for the US fell to 57.8 in December of 2021 from 58.3 in November and below market forecasts of 58.5, preliminary estimates showed. The reading pointed to the slowest growth in factory activity in a year. Although the pace of output growth quickened to the fastest for three months, the rate of expansion was muted compared to those seen earlier in the year as material shortages – although easing to the lowest since May, as measured by suppliers’ delivery times – hampered production again. The rate of job creation quickened to the fastest since June, but numerous panellists stated that problems finding and retaining staff persisted. Input prices continued to rise at a marked pace, offering firms little respite from inflationary pressure amid greater transportation, distribution and material costs. Output charges also rose sharply, albeit at the softest rate since April. Finally, output expectations for the year ahead were the greatest for four months.
2021-12-16